Tag Archives: J45

J45 Custom

J45 Custom

Grover’s original Rotomatic tuners are an engineering marvel, with style and performance exactly suited for the Gibson J-45 Custom acoustic electric guitar. With a gear ratio of 14:1, the Rotomatics deliver precision tuning in a durable housing that provides maximum protection for the gear and string post. All moving parts are cut for exact meshing, eliminating the possibility of slippage. A countersunk tension screw lets players regulate the tuning tension to any degree. A special lubricant inside the gear box provides smooth and accurate tuning stability.

The pickguard for the J-45 Custom is Gibson’s standard fire stripe tortoise tear drop shape, exactly as it appeared on the very first j-45 ギブソン in 1942. As with all of Gibson’s pickguards, the coloring, inlay, and binding are all done by hand.

The gibson j45 acoustic comes equipped with the popular Element Active Acoustic Pickup System from L.R. Baggs, which features a low-profile undersaddle element—or transducer—that’s proven more stable and durable than many standard ribbon-type pickups. Combined with an onboard preamp with an unobtrusive and removable volume control mounted just inside the soundhole, the Element delivers performance not previously attainable from an undersaddle pickup. Its sleek and effective design removes unnecessary internal components to enhance the coupling between the pickup and the guitar and improve the sensitivity of the transducer for a robust, lively and natural acoustic sound with excellent dynamics and delicate high end. The Element works with a standard 9V battery, which is housed inside the guitar in L.R. Bagg’s “Battery Bagg.”

The dovetail neck joint is one of the oldest—and best—ways of securely joining the neck to the body of a guitar. It is also a complex and expensive neck joint to build, but the result is a tight, locking connection that supports the neck at the proper neck-pitch angle, allowing the body and neck of the Gibson guitar to become one solid piece of resonating wood, with no metal to impede vibration. This process of gibson guitar j 45 is done entirely by hand, requiring patience and skill.

 

J45 Gibson

j45 gibson

Every acoustic guitar made by Gibson features hand-scalloped, radiused top bracing inside the body, a feature normally found only in limited run, hand-made guitars. By scalloping each brace by hand, the natural sound of the acoustic is focused more toward the center of the body, enhancing the instrument’s sound projection. The ギブソンj45 ヴィンテージ features a variation of Gibson’s “X” bracing pattern situated behind the soundhole, with a set of tall and thin braces for the back, and scalloped tall and thin braces for the top. This legendary bracing design delivers a balanced expression, with punchy, deep lows, warm mids, and clear, crisp highs. When pushed for more volume, the J-45 projects a natural compression, which helps it blend nicely with any accompaniment.

The dovetail neck joint is one of the oldest–and best–ways of securely joining the neck to the body of a guitar. It is also a complex and expensive neck joint to build, but the result is a tight, locking connection that supports the neck at the proper neck-pitch angle, allowing the body and neck to become one solid piece of resonating wood, with no metal to impede vibration. This process is done entirely by hand, requiring patience and skill.

The top of many “flat-top” guitars are under a lot of stress from the pull of the strings, which can eventually compromise the top. So, while most acoustic guitars are true “flat-top” gibson j-45 vine, all of the acoustics produced by Gibson in Bozeman, Montana have a radiused, or “tuned” top. Instead of being perfectly flat, a radiused or “tuned” top is raised slightly, and a special instrument is used to shape the top braces to the radius of the top. This process adds tension and strengthens the top, creating a less stressful joint where the top meets the sides and reducing the stresses of string pull. It also results in a “speaker cone” effect that maximizes sound projection, adding a significant boost to mid-range levels for a more balanced acoustic tone.

Epiphone J45

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Nicknamed “The Workhorse” and first introduced in 1942, Gibson’s most popular round-shoulder dreadnought guitar is world-renowned for its full, balanced expression, warm bass, and excellent projection. Subtle changes to the bracing of its predecessor-the J-35-made Gibson’s J-45 Standard one of most technically advanced acoustic electric guitars of its time.

Grover’s original Rotomatic tuners are an engineering marvel, with abundant style and performance exactly suited for the Epiphone J45 . With a gear ratio of 14:1, the Rotomatics deliver precision tuning in a durable housing that provides maximum protection for the gear and string post. All moving parts are cut for exact meshing, eliminating the possibility of slippage. A countersunk tension screw lets you regulate the tuning tension to any degree. A special lubricant inside the gearbox provides smooth and accurate tuning stability.

The top of the gibson j45 prezzo acoustic electric guitar is made from AA-grade Sitka spruce, while the back and sides are constructed from pattern-grade Honduran mahogany, giving the J-45 guitar its world renowned full, balanced expression, warm bass, and excellent projection. Selecting the right wood, and the formula to dry it out are two of the most pivotal processes in Gibson’s guitar-building process. Beginning with its first catalog in 1903, Gibson has assured its customers that every guitar would be built using woods with “the most durable, elastic, and sonorous qualities,” and today’s guitars from Gibson Acoustic maintain that standard.

The pickguard for the gibson j45 custom price acoustic electric guitar is Gibson’s standard plain tortoise tear drop shape, which has been used on the J-45 since its introduction in 1942. As with all of Gibson’s pickguards, the coloring, inlay, and binding are all done by hand.

The rosette on this gibson j45 history is a simple single-ring rosette consisting of three-ply binding, adding a stylish, understated elegance to the Gibson J-45 Standard.

J45 Guitar

j45

In 1947 Gibson officially introduced the J-50 guitar, essentially a natural-finish J-45, though Gibson shipped a handful of J-50 guitars already in 1942. One difference between the two is the top, which is triple-bound in the J-50 instead of single-bound; however, Gibson also made some early j-45 vintage ,J-45s with a triple-bound top. As mentioned, the sunburst finish was useful for hiding flaws in the wood. The J-50 wasn’t introduced until after World War II. Decent wood supplies were easier to come by, so Gibson didn’t need to resort to using imperfect wood on all its instruments. This better quality wood justified the production of the natural-finish J-50, as there were very few flaws which needed to be covered up by a sunburst finish. Gibson did continue to produce the sunburst J-45, however, and it is still an important part of Gibson’s production line today.

Nicknamed “The Workhorse” and first introduced in 1942, Gibson’s most popular round-shoulder dreadnought guitar is world-renowned for its full, balanced expression, warm bass, and excellent projection. Subtle changes to the bracing of its predecessor-the J-35-made Gibson’s J-45 Standard one of most technically advanced acoustic electric guitars of its time.

Grover’s original Rotomatic tuners are an engineering marvel, with abundant style and performance exactly suited for the Gibson J-45. With a gear ratio of 14:1, the Rotomatics deliver precision tuning in a durable housing that provides maximum protection for the gear and string post. All moving parts are cut for exact meshing, eliminating the possibility of slippage. A countersunk tension screw lets you regulate the tuning tension to any degree. A special lubricant inside the gearbox provides smooth and accurate tuning stability.

The top of the Gibson J-45 acoustic electric guitar is made from AA-grade Sitka spruce, while the back and sides are constructed from pattern-grade Honduran mahogany, giving the J-45 guitar its world renowned full, balanced expression, warm bass, and excellent projection. Selecting the right wood, and the formula to dry it out are two of the most pivotal processes in Gibson’s guitar-building process. Beginning with its first catalog in 1903, Gibson has assured its customers that every guitar would be built using woods with “the most durable, elastic, and sonorous qualities,” and today’s guitars from Gibson Acoustic maintain that standard.

The pickguard for the J-45 acoustic electric guitar is Gibson’s standard plain tortoise tear drop shape, which has been used on the J-45 since its introduction in 1942. As with all of Gibson’s pickguards, the coloring, inlay, and binding are all done by hand.

Gibson J45

Gibson J45

The Gibson J-45 is an acoustic guitar model manufactured by the Gibson Guitar Corporation. It is part of Gibson’s round-shoulder, dreadnought acoustic “jumbo” line, begun in 1934 with the Gibson Jumbo Flattop which was to compete with C.F. Martin & Company’s “D” line.

The J-45 is generally regarded as Gibson’s most famous and widely used acoustic guitar model. Introduced in 1942 with a list price of $45, it was conceived as a replacement for the earlier J-35 model, which was an inexpensive, Great Depression-era flattop guitar. The J-45 initially varied only slightly from the discontinued J-35. Some of the changes were internal, such as strengthened bracing, while exterior changes included the new teardrop-shaped pickguard, and a headstock decal with the Gibson logo replacing the old stark white ‘Gibson’ silkscreen logo of the thirties, and the slogan “Only a Gibson Is Good Enough.” The J-45 also had a more rounded, “baseball bat” style neck, as opposed to the “V” shape of the J-35 neck. Introduced during World War II, the J-45 standardized Gibson’s approach to the dreadnought guitar. The J-45 produced by Gibson today is substantially similar to the 1942 model.

Cosmetically, the 1967 gibson j45 was understated, intended as a durable no-frills “workhorse guitar” (its nickname given by the manufacturer). The binding was simple, the soundhole ring was austere, and the neck sported modest dot-shaped mother of pearl fretboard position markers. Gibson typically used the sunburst finish to cover up imperfections in the wood used on instruments, since it made the majority of the top of the guitar black. The J-45 was constructed of solid (as opposed to laminated) spruce wood for the top, while solid mahogany was used for the back and sides. In the intervening years though, the Gibson sunburst has become iconic to the degree that collectors prefer the J-45 to the higher end J-50s of the same era. Apart from a small batch of natural-finish J-45s produced in 1942, the model was offered only in the sunburst finish. The J-45 is known for its warm bass sound and good projection, as well as outstanding playability.